F.A.Q.s

What are neighboring rights?

Performers, musicians and all those who work and participate in the performance and interpretation of a musical work are the beneficiaries of the so called “musical rights” which is defined by law as “related” to the intellectual property right for which a fee must be paid to the performers for the public reproduction of their works, separate from the fee (renunciation) paid to the copyright.

What is meant by Public Performance?
What type of music does the license cover?
I pay a copyright license, should I also pay for neiboring rights or am I covered?

The obligation to pay neiboring Rights is a separate obligation from that of paying Copyright. Payment of copyright does not exempt any of the obligations to pay for neiboring rights.

What is the difference between using music as useful or necessary for business?
We get our music from a music provider so we have already paid for it. Do we have to pay for CNR?
We use music on our call center as well as in our restaurant. Does this mean that two licenses are needed?
We organize an annual event do we need a license for this?
I have many stores where music is used. How can I get permission for these?
Are small non-profit associations- organizations made up of volunteers required to obtain a license?
I am beautician and accept only a few customers a week, do I have to pay full rights?
I only have a TV in my store should I still pay rights?
What if I do not pay?
Where do the amounts received by CNR go to?